The Fear of Change- One Gal’s Observation

Who Seems to Fear it More, the Clinical or Administrative Teams?

Ok, so I am going to date myself now and my hope is that my dental contemporaries out there are not shy to chime in.

Remember when x-rays required dipping tanks? We’d go into the small (very small) darkroom and carefully unwrap each x-ray taking care not to touch the film with our hands. If we were developing a full series we would clip them methodically to the rack and carefully dip the x-rays into the developer. We would slowly be sure to cover the tank so that no light streamed in, set our timer and slithered out of this tiny space. Usually we didn’t have to even wait for the buzzer to go off since we were so accustomed to this “drill” that knowing when the films were ready was instinctive.

We would then go in, dip the films in the water and place them in the fixer tank. This routine was repeated throughout the day and all of us on the clinical team worked together throughout the process. Boy, was that developer/fixer dangerous stuff! No matter how careful we were it was not unusual to get it on our uniforms (that were always white by the way). There were no other choices in colors and they were dresses! That’s right, no pants, no scrubs, no options.

Then came the birth of the Automatic Processor. It was a huge change for us, but we did adjust rather quickly and effortlessly. I believe that it was such a vast improvement to what we had before–damaging our clothes and staining our hands. That’s right, no one wore gloves back then or masks either for that matter.

This transition was really a pleasure and I can clearly remember my practice mates rejoicing as to how much cleaner and more efficient this new method was. It saved us time too, since the process was much faster than the old traditional way. There were lots of smiling faces walking the halls of the Medical/Dental Building I worked in on Long Island–happiness everywhere!

Of course, since then we have graduated to digital x-rays, intraoral cameras and a myriad of other technical advancements. For some reason, the changes that were developed for the clinical side of the practice appeared to be much more readily accepted than the improvements that were made to the Business Office. I don’t know why, and perhaps my assessment is not accurate but I can distinctly remember the fear that came over the administrative side of the practice when the peg board system was replaced by THE COMPUTER!

I can clearly recall one of my fellow front desk buddies refused to let go of the “One-Write” system and would enter her information both in the computer and on paper. “I’m terrified of losing information. Where does this all go? What happens if the computer breaks?” (crashing wasn’t even in our vocabulary back then). And if this wasn’t scary enough, what about replacing the Appointment Book with the computer? OH NO! This was frightening to the Business Team AND the doctor.

Technical transition can either make us or break us, at least this is how we felt. How many practices would you say continued to maintain both a computer version of the schedule and a hard-copy appointment book version? From what I observed, I would say perhaps 85-90% initially.

No secret that dental peeps fear change, but I have noticed that the advancements on the clinical side of a practice do not seem to rattle team members quite as much as advancements within the front desk. I’m really not sure why, but there seemed to be a little more resistance when it came to enhancing systems that pertained to the business office.

Of course, now in this day and age everyone is working with lots of technology. I can honestly say that with the hundreds of practices that I have worked with over the years, I don’t know of one that is not computerized—well for the most part anyway. There are still a number of practices that have slowly migrated to a paperless practice. As a matter of fact, as recently as 3 months ago I worked onsite with a practice that was actually making clinical notes in the paper charts as well as documenting all information in the computer.

I’d be interested to hear from you regarding your thoughts on the difference between the clinical side of the office and the administrative side. Do you feel one department is somewhat more resistant to changes than the other? The administrative team is often gun-shy with the possibility of more work, fear of crashes, and they “don’t have the time”. Whereas the clinical team often welcomes advancements and enjoys challenges.

 

Change Even Scares Me

Rewriting my job description

As we come to what has historically been the end of summer–Labor Day–I realized that it marks an end for me too.

For the past 25 years or so I have put all my efforts and professional energy into both onsite and virtual dental team development, team integration, team maintenance and related subjects. I’ve written for many dental publications over the years, spoken across the country and have contributed to many online social networks.

Like everything in life, there are always some challenges, but I managed to make it through them all unscathed and consistently came back for more. I’ve met some amazing people along the way and although I’ve coached and advised hundreds, I’ve learned a ton from all of you and know for sure that I could never have gotten this far without the lessons you have taught me. Here I stand, someone who should be thinking about retirement like most of my peers, yet instead I am re-inventing myself one more time as I create a new role and developing a totally new job description for myself. Sound vaguely familiar, Linda Miles?

I must say that this change is bittersweet and I’m not afraid to admit that I too fear change to some degree. I know this is an ongoing issue for most of us in the dental profession, and all of us discuss the fear of change quite a bit. But how can I not practice what I preach? Change must happen, for if we all lock ourselves in and choose to never make adjustments or changes, how can growth occur?

I’ve been here before, but each time it’s been a little difficult. If we become obsessed with the risks connected with this, then we should also be concerned about leaving our homes since we could get hit by a truck, or not taking chances with other things that we routinely do on a daily basis.

As OurPerioTeam begins to take off and show traction and the interest is beginning to percolate, I know that I’m needed here at this point, supporting the growth, development, and ongoing enhancement of the product. Although we have an amazing Sales and Marketing Liaison, Lisa Mergens, she is not only not going to be able to manage everything on her own, but in short time she will require help to support her efforts. I plan on being involved, but it’s been a tough adjustment for me to come to the reality that working with dental teams in the capacity that I had been for years is now going to change.

What is helping me with this “change” is that I have decided to continue to stay active on social networks, continue to write and contribute articles to support my peers, and give back to all those that helped me get to this place. I will not charge for any advice I offer, but I will only have time to offer limited suggestions and guidance based on my new job description and work schedule.

Believe it or not, setting up this arrangement with myself really did ease the anxiety so now I can sleep better.