Have You Ever Been a Scapegoat?

Venting anger is never productive

As we come closer to closing the book on 2019, I would like to reflect on something I’ve recognized that seemed to be more prevalent this past year than ever before.  I understand clearly what the catalyst is in this case. I believe much of what I personally have been experiencing is based on the fact that the pool of qualified dental professionals appears to be growing smaller. I can’t explain it, nor can any of my peers. And although there are still some wonderful, talented and valued dental professionals out there it does take longer to locate and identify them. It’s not only more time-consuming for me, but some of my clients are clearly losing their patience, and in some cases their faith that a reasonable number of quality dental professionals still exist. I continue to assure them all that although it is clearly taking longer to attract and vet job candidates, they are still out there waiting for us to find them.

Over the past few weeks I have had two clients venting their frustrations to me. “Why can’t you find talented, reliable, qualified, loyal, professional, non-money-generated candidates?”  I had one actually send me a scathing text in full caps sharing that he has one person leaving for better pay, one leaving for better hours and one leaving to have a baby—and added “now what am I to do?”

While I understand and feel his pain, I’m having a difficult time understanding why ranting at me is going to change anything. He closed by saying, “I’ve been in practice for 35 years and have never had anything like this happen before!” I was hurt initially but took a deep breath and realized that I have just become someone’s scapegoat. Once I calmed down I proceeded to respond by reminding him that: first, it isn’t the end of the world and that unfortunately this is one of the challenges of running a business; and second, that sometimes everything appears to fall apart at once, but it certainly doesn’t mean it’s the end.

There are ways of buying ourselves time by recruiting some temporary help while we search for the best candidates to fill the positions. I reminded him that venting his frustration in this way will clearly send a poor message to his existing team members, as there is no defeat here, simply a business challenge that will be addressed properly and resolved.

Challenges come at all of us at one time or another. Heaven knows I’ve had my share, but to take frustration and anger and direct it at someone else not only doesn’t solve anything, it will only make the mountain harder to climb, as it will then limit the support and respect you will receive from others just when you probably need it most.