Don’t Say No to Excellence

Passing on the right employee for the wrong reasons

So here is the scenario:

I get a call from a dentist requesting my guidance and the conversation goes something like this:

“Deb, I interviewed an amazing clinical assistant whose talent and attitude just knocked my socks off, yet I just can’t bring myself to hire her.”

“What is the reason?” I ask.

“Well, she shared with me that she plans on applying to dental school within the next 3 years and I can’t justify hiring someone (though so well qualified) if I have to say goodbye to them in a couple of years.”

“Let me understand. So you were both aligned with the salary offering, hours, days of the week, job description, etc., and you are passing on offering the position since she can only give you 3 years?”

“That about sums it up”, said my client.

Here was my response:

First off, she was forthright enough to share this information with you as many would not. This speaks highly of her character.

The fact that she could only assure you of 3 years of employment (even if it were less) is not a viable reason to not consider her for hire, and these are a few reasons why.

* The response I make quite often is, “I’d rather my clients have 3 years with a valuable, talented and reliable employee than 13 years with a less than adequate one”.

* Training a well-rounded employee, one that is passionate and enthusiastic, is usually a smooth and easy process.

* Having someone like this on your team will help to maintain a strong practice and team, along with serving as an excellent example for the group.

* Infusing your team with this level of employee can enhance the value of your practice and the care your patients receive, as well as potentially garnering positive internet reviews from your current patients.

* Because you both have been open and honest with each other, sharing transparencies and open communication will mean that when the time comes for her to move on, you will find no one will be more helpful or knowledgeable when it comes to filling their position than this employee.

* Their position within your practice will set standards and protocols that can then be replicated, transferred and passed on to her successor. Chances are she will help in locating and evaluating her replacement–I see this all the time.

* Her contributions and demeanor will very possibly add to the positive work environment for the rest of your team.

* Employees that are interested in “bettering” themselves should be supported and commended and quite frankly, celebrated!

In times like this, when there are not enough employees to go around, please don’t miss out on what could be the best hiring decision you’ve ever made!

What Do You Want?

Preparing for appropriate compensation

One of the topics that I see recurring on a regular basis in many social media forums is that of dental team compensation. It’s a subject that seems to show up more often than any other.

Questions such as “what do you pay your dental assistant?” to “when do you give increases?” While these inquiries are important, I find that the one major addition to the hiring process is simply going back to an area that should be obvious–yet so many simply skip it. Few prepare for this, the most important facet of the hiring process.

How many are aware of their market?

The range of salaries for the various positions?

How many have even an idea as to how much the position they are wanting to fill is worth?

I have some concrete protocols in place for my clients, but before we can even move forward with the process, I ask that they not only check their budget, but also conduct some due diligence related to their specific market. I’m not sure how we all drifted off from these very basic standard guidelines, but somehow we often count on the job candidate to set the standards.

Compensation based on what the job candidate made in their past position, what they “want” to make or what they “need” to make is not only a completely illogical approach, but one that will typically result in major problems down the road.

In preparation for hire, consider some valuable diligence so that YOU set the stage.

What’s your budget?

What does the job entail?

Are they the only business office employee, clinical assistant or hygienist in the practice? Working alone can require more responsibilities and could affect salary.

Are there specific certifications required?

Are you asking this employee to participate out of the traditional 8-5 4 day/week schedule? Yes, this can warrant additional compensation in some cases.

I work with my clients on touching many points prior to making the final hire, but if you consider applying one of the above parameters, I can assure you that you will be ahead of the curve. Heck, you may even find that you are much more successful onboarding new employees and experience a lot less costly turnover.

Team Mutiny is Nothing to Take Lightly

Losing several team members in a short amount of time is probably NOT a coincidence

Losing employees is a part of doing business, but receiving resignation notices from several team members a few weeks apart is a “sign”.

Granted, things happen. Spouses/significant others are transferred, employees retire, team members want to work closer to home, and yes, there are those that know they are just not a fit or are simply not happy.  But when 2 or 3 employees give their notice over the course of a few weeks or a month you need to know this is not coincidental and is something to look at and explore.

There is a catalyst that is causing this “chain” of events, and though it may be difficult to look at and uncover the reason this is happening, it’s important that the employer closely review why they appear to be dropping like flies.  If this syndrome is not addressed I must sadly tell you that it will happen again. 

There are several areas to investigate and some deep introspective thoughts that must occur in order to stop the bleeding.  This is not an easy thing to do, but without properly addressing the problem and identifying the catalyst, it will unfortunately be but a matter of time before it happens again.

How are your leadership skills? How are your communication skills? Do you support an “open door” policy with your team members when it comes to voicing their opinions and concerns? Do you recognize their contributions to the practice (as well as watch for those that tend to take advantage and lean on others whenever they can)? Is the practice environment one that is democratic with mutual respect all around? 

And what about your team?  Do you feel that they work well and in harmony with each another or do you see where one team member is bullying the others even if it appears to be minimal from your vantage point? When you look at your team objectively can you see where one team member is more assertive than the rest? And let’s be totally honest and up-front—are YOU afraid of this person to some degree, thus letting a lot of the negative behavior slide?

There have been many times when I can see this occurring within a practice and the client/dentist–although very much aware of this–excuses poor behavior just so that they don’t have to replace this person and go through the hassle, or they fear that they will sabotage the business if they are dismissed so they simply turn the other cheek rather than to address the issue.

So, if you have ever experienced a mutiny in your practice, please don’t look at this as a minor problem and simply replace those that have chosen to walk and not look back.  You might say, “I just located all the wrong people” and in some cases one or two bad apples can slip in, particularly if you are not managing the team properly. 

However, the odds of multiple poor hires are very slim and cannot be attributed to poor interviewing protocols, although on the rare occasion it can happen.  Check your practice climate, evaluate it honestly along with the culture you have created. Then self-examine your short-comings as you openly study your existing team members.

I’m a very positive thinker and tend to look at the bright side. Nonetheless, if you can relate to this scenario you need to be realistic and course correct accordingly. 

 

Could it be Time to Redesign and Rebuild Job Descriptions?

Change for changing times

Have you noticed the gradual change that is occurring within the culture and the “flavor” of  dental practices today?

For years a list of the basic duties for each of the major dental positions has always been more than adequate, and the basic skill sets were enough to get the job done.  Today, with the influx of new technology and new clinical discoveries we are becoming more and more aware of the need to not only attract higher talent from our hiring pools, but once they are hired, onboarding and team maintenance is starting to looking a lot different.  

Finding strong candidates can be difficult, but as I always say, “They are there. You just need to understand how to attract and find them”. And when you do, it’s the integration, training and ongoing support that will complete the circle. You see, simply bringing them into the fold is far from finding that perfect hire. It doesn’t stop here.

We need to “up our game” so that we meet the changes that are occurring within the style of the practice.

I’m looking at this as “Designer Job Descriptions”. What I mean by this is what has worked in the past is not necessarily going to be effective within our current climate. Practices are starting to make major shifts in the way they operate today. Creativity when it comes to building a list of responsibilities has become an even more important segment of the hiring process.  The need for out-of-the-box thinking is something employers should be seriously considering and evaluating today.  The old stand-by job descriptions that worked in the past will probably not make it now.  

Some of the interpersonal traits that became much of the driving force when it came to locating the best hires should probably be revisited. Of course, the basics never change—honesty, integrity, loyalty, professionalism, etc.  It’s just that now we need to strongly consider those that are willing to shift gears, roll with the punches and not roll with their eyes.

They must be willing to listen and “try” to incorporate new systems and protocols as they find their way into the practice culture. The advancements we are seeing within the dental practice is in fast-track mode and every area of the practice is beginning to feel the affects.  We should no longer expect that the basic bullet point list of job descriptions and responsibilities will continue to suffice in this new world of dentistry.

It’s time to assemble and then align a team that is coming from the same place as the trajectory of the practice. 

With the surge of sleep medicine, state-of-the-art technology on both the business and clinical side of the practice (along with internal and external marketing strategies), it is necessary to build a team that can stay committed and educated with each and every new addition—flexibility at its best!!  

Look for more posts on this subject…

What is Your Price Tag?

Evaluation of a “Service Role”

If you were asked to value yourself–actually produce a price tag to hang from your wrist–what would it say? And by the way, how would you determine what a “fair” market price might be when it comes to how much an employer might pay for you?

Establishing a price tag for an inanimate object is definitely much easier than ascertaining a number for services rendered by a thinking, breathing, living human being. Nonetheless, many of us are hired based on the services we provide and the knowledge we have worked hard to acquire that can then be shared and transferred to better support the skillsets and proficiencies in others.

Is it tenure that we measure? Is it how many events we have publicly attended? Is it who we hang out with and rub elbows with? Is it the articles we have written and the presentations we have given?

I’d say all of this contributes to our perceived “worth”. Familiarity contributes to a big part of this, but what might really be the catalyst that enables a realistic price to be put on one’s services? What does your track record look like? Have you been a trend-setter, a pioneer or are you “beefing” up areas that others have already explored? Have you discovered a niche–something that might be virtually untapped by others that you yourself have pioneered through trial and error. Have you done the “dirty work” that has paved a path for others to follow? And even more valuable, have you saved others from a possible failure or “wrong-turn”?

Can you physically show successes you have been instrumental in attaining in black and white? Is just stating “this is what I do” truly enough to justify the price tag you command? See if this is something you can relate to:

Passion vs. Position

Ethics vs. Ego

Innovator vs. Imitator

When the product is “YOU”, there are no discounts.

One Man’s Treasure

What might not be the best employee for one dentist, might be perfect for another

It’s time to seek a new employee. You go through the necessary “drill” to help you locate as many viable, appropriate candidates as you can. You narrow the field down to 3, the two then the one remaining that appears to be a good fit for your practice. You see a name on her resume that is very familiar to you, and upon further research you remember where you heard the name. He was a fellow dental school student and although you haven’t seen or spoken to him in years, you take the time to track him down.

Without first asking permission of the potential employee (which should never be done) you call to speak with him about the candidate you are considering. “Oh no”, says your old friend, “stay clear of her.” Wow, you think to yourself–this is a pretty strong statement. You’ve actually completed much of your hiring process and find this hard to believe.

Every instruction has been followed perfectly. She is well spoken and professional, had a long history in the two other practices where she worked during her career and was legitimately interested in working in your practice and oh—the team loved her! No doubt the once statement from the past contemporary caused you to stop dead in your tracks. You couldn’t help but wonder that maybe she isn’t all that you thought she was.

In light of the fact that you believed she could be the perfect employee for your practice and you were excited and prepared to continue the process, you still choose to move on and continue to interview others. Unfortunately, no one even came close to this particular candidate, and what was also quite interesting is that as she continued to interview, she too found that no practice or employer compared to this one.

With all the due diligence conducted successfully (the background check and drug testing came back clean as a whistle) the hiring dentist chose to pass on this person and continue to seek additional candidates. Days went by and then it became weeks. Neither one (the employer or the job candidate) were able to find another situation that felt quite as “right”. The frustration level was rising for both of them not being able to find a better option.

I am then approached by the employer/dentist who asked me for help and advice. My advice was this: there are so many reasons why one sees an employee as a great asset when someone else may not.

It could be as innocent as the employee being quiet by nature when the last employer preferred a gregarious and outgoing behavioral style.

What if another employee was threatened by the advanced skill sets of the employee in question?

Another common problem is the jealousy issue—not to generalize, but women can often be this way.

Nonetheless, are these reasons for you to move on? Whether they are or are not, I always advise my clients to continue to conduct “your” screening in “your” way and make a decision based on “your” specific situation. Take it slowly, hire gradually, make certain this candidate is a good fit for you in spite of what someone else is feeling more on a “personal level” than a “professional level”.

Granted, if the concerns have to do with performance or ethical issues, then there would be no reason to conduct additional due diligence. It’s these rare occasions that would be more legitimate cause to warrant some reservations on your part.

Are You Totally Prepared to Jump In?

Changing your wrong hires and short-term hires to winning employees!

The majority of dentists, when realizing it is time to hire a new team member, will either contract with an agency, search internet “resume clearing houses”, write an ad (or assign someone in the practice to construct one), or simply start asking local colleagues and dental peers for referrals. And let us not forget asking patients if they “know someone” (which I believe is the worst mistake of all).

No matter what avenue you take or the vehicle you use to attract candidates, the same applies in every case and that is that you need to have a well-developed plan in place prior to starting the process.  It isn’t simply ” Okay, let’s start interviewing people as soon as we start to see some good resumes or responses coming through.” I think not! It’s a bit more involved than this.

That is “if” you are seeking the best employees for you and your practice.  That is “if” you are wanting to hire passionate, honest, high integrity employees and “if” you can expect them to stay with you as long as possible.  You see, anyone can locate interested personnel, but are they the right people for your practice, do they align with your practice culture, philosophy and business model?  These are the things that will help assure you of not just filling an opening, but bringing in the quality employees you are truly seeking.

It may seem like a waste of time and effort, but honestly once the groundwork is laid and the systems and protocols are in place, it’s just a matter of reusing these materials each time you require additional team members and tweaking them to fit the specific requirements of the new employee. Although following this methodology will add this type of discipline into your hiring routine, you will probably find that you will not be going through this “drill” nearly as often as you have prior to working with structure in your hiring process.

I will list for you chronologically what you will require to change things for the better:

  1. Know exactly what you are looking for. Create a thorough, comprehensive Job Description for this position before you do anything else. Type it out with your letterhead.  This should be presented to every candidate that makes it in for a face-to-face-interview.
  2. Be prepared with a salary range (this is a RANGE that can fluctuate based on candidate).  This means that you do your homework.  Know what skill sets they MUST have to begin with. What licensures they MUST have.  Whether they will be working alone or have someone else with them (this can affect salary either up or down). Be well prepared and knowledgeable here even if you must conduct some due diligence.
  3. If you insist upon the traditional “Working Interview” (with which I discourage, by the way), I prefer a “Skill Assessment”, which is conducted during non-patient hours and is simply an extension of the interview process. If you have them in for a Working Interview then be prepared in advance with a compensation amount and paperwork that supports the time spent. This release should be signed by the doctor and the job applicant. You should have an amount per hour for this day preset so the candidates are aware of this prior to coming in. I can supply you with a sample if you email me @ deb@ourdentalteam.com Remember to have the WI overseen by a reliable team member or one of your family members.  They should not be alone to have access to patient records or information of any kind.
  4. Be prepared to supply the strong applicants with an overview of the hours and days that they will be responsible for.
  5. Having the finalists (you may have more than one) have lunch or coffee with your present team (without doctors). This is an excellent opportunity for the team to get a better feel for the candidate.
  6. If you don’t have a reputable company to conduct background checks and drug tests, please find one. This would be one of the very last steps prior to determining a starting wage. Until you have all these pieces completed you should not be offering anyone a position.
  7. Checking references is a tough one, although I do have a protocol I created a number of years ago.
  8. When everything clears and you and your team feel comfortable to offer this person the position, a Job Proposal should be created with every bit of information pertaining to their involvement with your practice.  This is when you should have them review your Employee/Practice Manual.  You must encourage them to read it and initial each page.  In it you should include things such as dress codes, CE courses, vacation information, well days, etc.  They should have everything understood and sign off on it all which will save you from those questions about time off, bereavement pay, etc., that so often comes up later.
  9. Your Job Proposal should also be thorough and comprehensive with regard to when checks are cut.  If you utilize my Progressive Salary Program System that gradually brings salary up as new skills are successfully acquired.
  10. Bringing in a new team member should also be an Office Event, especially when you find you are not hiring as often. Make their presence a big deal.  Balloons? A bio and picture of them set up in the Reception Room? Make sure every team member introduces them to each and every patient, vendor, mail/delivery people and others.